You are viewing tgpos

Transgender People of Size's Journal
 
[Most Recent Entries] [Calendar View] [Friends]

Below are the 15 most recent journal entries recorded in Transgender People of Size's LiveJournal:

    Monday, March 15th, 2010
    12:37 pm
    [zcme]
    NOLOSE - call for workshops (apologies for cross-posts)
    NOLOSE '10 June 4-6, 2010 Econolodge Oakland, CA
    Fat Panic!

    Call for Workshops, Hands-on Activities, You Name It

    This year, we are actively seeking workshop proposals along a theme: Fat Panic!
    We want to address the disturbing trend towards villainizing and fear mongering aimed at and about our fat bodies from the media, the medical field, academia and other areas of social change like some parts of the environmentalist and food justice movements.

    We look forward to talking, yelling, planning and scheming about Fear of Fatness and global obesity facts and fictions! We are interested in approaching the topic from a number of different perspectives including, but not limited to the Health At Every Size (HAES) philosophy, academia, media justice, international/global perspectives, art/culture, food justice and more.

    The workshop possibilities are endless under this umbrella and around these topics, so put your thinking caps on! We would like to have at least one workshop per timeslot that falls into the Fat Panic! track. Of course, there is still plenty of room for workshops that don't necessarily tie into the theme too, so don't be shy. Bring it on!

    This year, the conference will actually encompass 3 full days of workshops, entertainment and activities. We will have workshops beginning sometime on Friday, June 4, all day Saturday and part of Sunday. This gives us the opportunity to have more workshops and activities, and we have received feedback that workshops should have longer timeslots, so this is something we are considering as well.

    Some ideas about what we are looking for:

    Read more...Collapse )

    Deadline for proposals is March 31, 2010.

    All conference attendees (fat dykes, lesbians, bisexual women, trans folks, and our female & trans allies) are welcome to send proposals.

    Please keep in mind that we have a diverse crowd, so assume a broad range of sizes, physical abilities, ethnicities, nationalities and genders among your participants. We ask that people leading physical activity classes prepare alternate exercises for people using scooters, chairs and wheelchairs. Please indicate your plan to do this in your proposal.
    To send us your idea, please complete the simple form at the NOLOSE website. Any questions? Just ask programming@nolose.org.

    Please re-post!
    Saturday, December 26th, 2009
    11:41 am
    [zcme]
    NOLOSE fundaiser for 2010 conference scholarship/FA funds
    NOLOSE is your community.

    "Both times I've come to NOLOSE in 2006 and 2008, it was with the support of scholarships. As a student and working artist, I wouldn't have been able to afford the costs of full participation, but without NOLOSE, I would literally be lost throughout the year else. There's no other event in the country where I'm so heartily embraced for my fierce, fat, queer, femme colored self, and that means so much to me!" said Naima Lowe, an exceptionally talented fat queer femme of color activist, filmmaker, NOLOSE conference attendee, and scholarship recipient.

    Every year, 100% of NOLOSE's scholarship funding comes from you. Community-led fundraisers like the Fat Girl Flea help us bring many activists from all over the world to the nation's only conference dedicated to building a space for fat, queer, and trans folks to analyze, mobilize, organize, and celebrate. As an organization, NOLOSE is dedicated to building a movement, a voice, and a vibrant community of fierce fat folks and allies.

    Scholarships are an integral part of ensuring that the most under-resourced in our community can take part in this beautiful, life-changing space.

    This year, the NOLOSE board is committed to holding an even bigger (pun intended!) and more successful conference by providing an increased amount of financial aid to our attendees. We may be small in numbers, but you, the community, have shown again and again just how dedicated you are. We believe in you and we want to give you this opportunity to continue in your partnership with NOLOSE and the fat queer & trans movement.

    "As a super-sized, dis/abled person I deeply appreciated NOLOSE recognizing that I may be in a position to need extra financial help attending the conference. NOLOSE truly valued my presence as well as the contributions of other disproportionately affected peoples, and was willing to work to get us there," said another NOLOSE scholarship recipient.
      Our scholarships prioritize funding for people who have historically been the most under-represented at NOLOSE and in the movement: people with financial need, trans and gender non-conforming folks, people with disabilities, people of color, people over 50, super fatties, and starting this year, international attendees. NOLOSE's dedication to diversity isn't just lip service; we walk the talk and believe that our movements can only succeed when they are led by those most affected by social injustices.

    We ask you to help support your friends and peers by giving to the NOLOSE Scholarship Fund. 100% of your gift will go towards the Scholarship Fund, which will resource even more brilliant gorgeous activists' attendance at the next conference, which promises to be the best one yet!

    Even if $5 or $10 is all you can give, we urge you to consider making a tax-deductible contribution via our Facebook Cause page or our Network for Good page. And, $10 a month can turn into $120 via monthly giving, which is a great way to stretch your dollar and show your continued support.

    But whether or not you give (although we hope you will!), we on the NOLOSE board wanted to also take this opportunity to give thanks to all of you who make up the hearts, souls, brains, and bodies of the movement. We love you, and we can't wait to see you on the West Coast at the next conference!


    Big fat love,
    Cristy, Devra, Amanda, Geleni, Jen, Joe, Kim, Tara, Sondra, and Zoe

    (Please repost!  Apologies for cross-posts!)
    Monday, August 11th, 2008
    8:03 pm
    [zcme]
    NOLOSE 2008 conference program online now!

    Announcing the NOLOSE 2008 Conference Program!



    x-posted all over the place. please help spread the word!

    NOLOSE is a conference for fat queer women, trans people and our allies.  see the website for more information.
    Thursday, May 29th, 2008
    8:39 pm
    [zcme]
    come register for NOLOSE '08!
    Woo hoo! NOLOSE Online Registration is now up and running!
    Early bird deadline for registration: Aug. 28
    • registration, hotel and accessibility information
    • call for proposals! (deadline has been extended to July 1)
    • financial assistance (deadline for the first round: July 1)
    • new! scholarships



    • [x-posted all over; please spread the word!]
    Monday, March 17th, 2008
    5:07 pm
    [zcme]
    nolose 2008
    NOLOSE 08: save the date!
    NOLOSE , an annual conference for fat queer women, trans folks and our allies, is in NoHo this year!  Save the date for NOLOSE 2008!
     
    The date has been set! Mark your calendars for NOLOSE '08: September 26th through the 28th (Friday-Sunday).  Meet us by the pool at the Clarion Hotel and Conference Center in Northampton, Massachusetts for a weekend packed with fattastic fun, food, friends and other good stuff!
     
    We're all hard at work, planning to make this year's conference the best ever! There are a lot of exciting things in the works. The Clarion has charm, a great location and a staff that is already excited to hang out with all of us.  As always, choosing a venue was no easy feat. We have a very diverse population and we have lots of factors to take into consideration. All in all, we are pretty psyched about the Clarion, and we are sure most of you will be too.
     
    Keep your eyes open for more detailed information about the conference as it becomes available and, as always, if you have some ideas about what you'd like to see at NOLOSE this year, let us know!  Expect to see a call for workshops in the very near future, because that's how we roll.
     
    *************************
    And, now, something fun and interactive for you!
    We would like to get to know as many members of our community as we can, so please take a few moments and click the link below to answer a couple of questions--even if you think there isn't anything we could possibly not already know about you. We promise it will be brief and the information we gather will help us build our community and make our time together even better.
    http://www.surveymonkey.com/s.aspx?sm=WILQvlXy3NKj_2bXYARKWbww_3d_3d

    _____
    x-posted like crazy.  sorry for cross-postings.  please help spread the word!
    Thursday, January 31st, 2008
    11:05 pm
    [zcme]
    Fat And Queer Conference 2/23/08
    The New York City radical fat political group "Fat and Queer" [FAQ] is organizing a one day conference in February entitled "Fat is Contagious: Political Fat Queer Visibility and Action in the Era of the 'Obesity Epidemic.' "

    The event will occur in Manhattan on Saturday February 23, 2008 from 10-6 at the University Settlement House, a wheel-chair accessible space in the Lower East Side at Bowery/Houston.

    The keynote address will be given by Marilyn Wann, author of "Fat!So?:Because You Don't Have to Apologize for Your Size."
    This will be followed by afternoon workshop sessions and an evening cabaret performance and dance party at Rapture in the East Village from 8-11pm.

    See our website for more information and to register.

    Hope to see you there!

    Questions? NYC.FAQ [at] gmail [dot] com

    Add us on myspace!

    Add us on livejournal!

    If you would like to be kept up to date on FAQ events, join our listserve.

    **Please repost, forward, and help spread the word.***

    Please excuse innumerable x-postings.
    Wednesday, January 2nd, 2008
    9:47 pm
    [zcme]
    fat and queer: call for proposals
    hi folks, we're still looking for proposals for the upcoming NYC conference on 2/23/08, " 'Fat is Contagious:' Political Fat Queer Visibility and Action in the Era of the 'Obesity Epidemic.' " please do submit a workshop proposal asap. thanks!


    CALL FOR PROPOSALSCollapse )

    x-posted everywhere. sorry if this is showing up on your f-list many times.

    please repost and help spread the word!


    add us on MySpace!
    Thursday, December 13th, 2007
    10:56 am
    [zcme]
    fat and queer: call for proposals
    CALL FOR PROPOSALS

    The New York City radical fat political group "Fat and Queer" [FAQ] is organizing a one day conference in February entitled " 'Fat is Contagious:' Political Fat Queer Visibility and Action in the Era of the 'Obesity Epidemic.' "

    The event will occur in Manhattan on Saturday February 23, 2008 at the University Settlement House, a wheel-chair accessible space in the Lower East Side at Bowery/Houston.

    The keynote address will be given by Marilyn Wann, author of Fat!So?: Because You Don't Have to Apologize for Your Size.

    Following that, we will have two sessions of workshops, with three workshops in each session.  In the evening we hope to have a cabaret performance and dance party and are still negotiating space for that event.

    We are currently issuing a call for proposals for workshops on the topic of political fat queer visibility and action in the era of the 'obesity epidemic.'

    We specifically seek workshop proposals which are action-oriented and are on the following themes, however all submissions will be considered:
    • Building Fat Social/Activist networks
    • Fat studies/fat theory
    • Weight loss and fat activism
    • Health at any size
    • Trans and fat
    • Fat and sexuality
    • Allies
    • Fat and disability
    • History of fat activism
    • Challenging healthist discourse within and outside of the fat activist movement
    • Fat activism within social justice movements and creating solidarity with other social justice movements
    • Guerrilla art/action
    • Childhood obesity
    • Medical self advocacy
    If you are interested in submitting, please send your workshop proposal to: NYC.FAQ [at] gmail [dot] com by January 20, 2008.

    If you would like to be kept up to date on FAQ events, join our listserve and check out  f_and_q
    To help organize the conference and other FAQ events, join our organizers' listserve.

    More details about the specifics of the conference will be forthcoming.

    X-posted all over.  Sorry if this is showing up on your f-list a zillion times! Please repost and keep spreading the word! 

    xoxo,
    FAQ
    Wednesday, March 1st, 2006
    10:40 am
    [ftmwolfcasey]
    Intro
    1. How does your identity as trans or gender-variant person converge with your weight, height or body shape?

    I think the depression and anxiety that I feel being both transsexual and overweight feed into each other and make things worse. It's hard enough being overweight (even though most Americans are overweight, the cultural standard still sways toward being lean) by itself, and it's hard enough to be trans by itself, but when those two factors are combined it's like putting water in acid. I've found that it's far easier to be a fat guy than it is to be a fat girl any day of the week, but that doesn't diminish the shit you get simply for being fat to begin with.

    2. What are the unique pressures put on trans/gender-variant people in regards to their weight?

    I imagine that being immersed in this culture everyone picks up on the pressures of how to look and what to weigh, but I think that for transfolk in particular, there's a cycle of  scrutiny that takes the pressure up a notch. We're already examining ourselves through a distorted lens (you're your own worst critic, right?), and then we have everyone else in the world thinking/saying things like, "Hmm...she's awfully tall. I wonder about her sometimes" or "Hmm...his voice is kinda whispy. I wonder about him sometimes." That makes you ultra-conscious of your appearance anyway. Add the weight and you'll be doubly conscious, especially as it relates to your passing abilities.

    3. What is the intersection between trans passability/plausibility and height and weight?

    Taller and somewhat larger FTM's will almost always pass better than those of us who are shorter and perhaps don't quite "measure up." I think being heavier weight-wise as an FTM can actually make it easier to pass because sometimes it helps to hide the curves and the breasts can be passed off as fat-man's chest, but then they turn right around and rip you a new one for not keeping up with the masculine standard of beauty so you're put into this awful double bind.

    4. What are the unique pressures that FTMs face in terms of body image in a misogynistic, heterosexist and transphobic culture? MTFs?

    I think we're all facing pressure by virtue of living in a society where these attitudes are so incredibly pervasive that conformity to them is regarded as entirely natural and, conversely, any deviation from them is unnatural/wrong/sinful. Specifically, I think many...not all but certainly very many...transpeople play up the stereotypes, i.e. transmen who aren't just themselves and feel they must overcompensate by drinking a gallon of whiskey, driving the biggest damn pick-up trucks they can find, talking like a sailor, making sexist jokes, and bench-pressing 500 lbs. and getting compound hernias/transwomen who aren't just themselves and feel they must overcompensate by  altering their inflections to be more 'femme,' buying the beauty product aisles, dressing like Sarah Jessica Parker on Sex and the City, and acting like doddering June Cleaver clones.


    5. Do you experience the trans community as affirming of size diversity or as fat-positive?

    Well, putting aside the fact that I have a hard time seeing a very cohesive " trans community" at all, no, I don't find it to be very affirming of larger folks on the whole. Individually, people's attitudes will vary of course, but in general it seems that you really have to dig to find acceptance on a broader scale. Speaking from my own experience, I feel a great deal of pressure as an FTM to be a perfect male specimen, even in a place like Memphis where most people aren't exactly healthy weights. FTM's want you to be some damned Adonis. Sometimes it feels like the message I'm really getting is, "If you aren't tall, lean, ripped, and the epitome of handsome, you're not really a worthy, smart, or attractive man."

    6. Do you experience the size acceptance community as trans-positive and affirming?

    Frankly, I didn't even realize that there was such a thing as the size acceptance community, so I can't exactly say that I have experience with it. However, I would surmise that it's probably not very affirming given that most people in our culture are repulsed by transgenderism. From trying to bridge the gaps in my own communities (Memphis and Tennessee, that is), I can assure that you that just because people belong to a marginalized group does not automatically guarantee that they will possess empathy and understanding for other marginalized groups.

    7. Describe a particular conversation or life incident where issues of size and gender diversity intersected in some way

    Last week, I drove to Nashville with a group of people to participate in Tennessee Equality Project's Advancing Equality on the Hill Day where we lobbied our state legislators on bills that would affect the community. It didn't take me long at all to notice that even though I was lobbying with a group of transpeople, I was the only one who was overweight. And oddly enough, it was fine for the politician to interrupt me or dismiss the points I had to make, whereas my much, much, much thinner and more attractive colleagues were more readily listened to and taken seriously. About a week later, I was forwarded the group photos. Now mind you that I only begrudgingly participated in photos because with the way I photograph, you're expecting me to be holding up a number and hearing, "Turn to the left." The person who forwarded me the pictures says to me, "You look....good. I think we all look great." Perhaps I'm being overly sensitive, but it just seemed like what he said had a patronizing, pejorative slant to it.
    Monday, February 27th, 2006
    10:51 pm
    [andipandi]
    survey
    well, i'm not too great at these things, and i make no attemp to spell correctly...

    1. How does your identity as a trans or gender-variant
    person converge with your weight, height or body
    shape?

    well, i'm not really trans, so for me its sort of hard to say. However, i do beleive that many people who happen to be trans tend to be a bit more body conscience then other non trans people. Forinsistace, so many trans people study thier body soo much. They are thier own downfall. Theres this idea of what a man and what a women is. Stupid things like, big feet, small hands, brood sholders and larger hips seems to make trans people very self conscience. I understand there is some validity to some of these fears, but i think many trans people jsut judge themselves way too much. I understand the self judgement, as i have experianced it myself, but the biggest thing i have learned over my short life thus far is, no drug and surgery can make you who you are. These things can help the push, but its really about how you feel about yourself that gets you where your trying to get. Honestly, once you learn to care for yourself as you are, you'll understand theres no where else to go, as your issues will be resolved... body image wise.

    2. What are the unique pressures put on
    trans/gender-variant people in regards to their
    weight?

    I don't think there are any pressures put on trans/gender-variant people in regards to their
    weight. I think the pressures that are mostly felt are that of the indivigual. Think about it, this part of the world is centered around what a male should be, what a women should be. So we take those ideas and interinalize them. I tell myself that to be happy i have to loose 40 pounds, i tell myself that to be a "real man" i have to have huge mussles and a lean body. But this is not ture, this is just what society makes us think is true. So there are some presures put on everyone, but its about how we deal with them as indiviuals that makes the difference. I never lost a ounce of weight when i was trying to do it for other people. But since i learned to apprieate myself and my size for what i am, i have become more healthy and more happy.


    3. What is the intersection between trans
    passability/plausibility and height and weight?

    I don't really understand this question. But, i think trans people think that men are big(mussley) and tall women small and short. Really this is a society thing. You get your ass outta this crap country, and most will find it much better in trems of passability/plausibility with height and weight. Other contries are much more open to larger girls and smaller guys, other counties are also much more open and could care less about transgendered people. Hell, many counties have pills/ medications that are made for the ues of gender change, and do not possess all the side effects that united staters have to deal with.

    4. What are the unique pressures that FTMs face in
    terms of body image in a misogynistic, heterosexist
    and transphobic culture? MTFs?

    i think for both ftm's and mtf's its about equal in terms of transphobic cultere. The biggest difference is a mtf sometiems has to deal with it thier whole life, and a ftm does not. This is due to our counties standards of passibility.

    5. Do you experience the trans community as affirming
    of size diversity or as fat-positive?

    Its about the same as any other americanized comminity. Americans want slim hot bodies, and judge within themselves. This is true for most sub- culters... expeicaly the gay one.

    6. Do you experience the size acceptance community as
    trans-positive and affirming?

    i have no experince with them.

    7. Describe a particular conversation or life incident
    where issues of size and gender diversity intersected
    in some way.

    i don't know if i had one.. not that i remember right now.
    10:06 am
    [etana]
    The questionnaire that won't leave my f'list....grins....
    m'kay...

    1. How does your identity as a trans or gender-variant person converge with your weight, height or body shape?
    I've found that my size has affected very much so my gender identity. Depending on whether I was very thin or am not so thin I've found a gender niche to fit that. It's only been in the last three months or so that I've allowed my brain to wrap around the idea that one can be femme and fat at the same time. I've mostly felt more comfortable identifying as butch or masculine when fat.

    2. What are the unique pressures put on trans/gender-variant people in regards to their weight?
    From my observations and conversations I find that ftm folks have to get bulkier - get those biceps roarin', etc. MTF folks, on the other hand, are shaving off their size bit by bit - expected to get as tiny and "feminine" as possible. I think gender-variant/queer folks have a unique roll to fill in that their "genderqueer"status lies heavily on their size - both in height and weight. In order to be a bio-girl genderqueer one is expected to be teeny tiny with very small (or binded) breasts and a small, angular face. Bio-boys have to fit the same description - teeny tiny with a small, angular (or just round for both) face. They both have to have a certain hair cut - more butch for a bio-girl (meaning shooort) and more femme for a bio-boy (meaning longer) so that the two types of bodies meet in the middle. All these strict roles for all 3 categories leave very little room for self-identification and biologicaly/physical differences, in my opinion.

    3. What is the intersection between trans passability/plausibility and height and weight?
    I think that obviously a taller, bulkier ftm is going to pass as male and a smaller, shorter mtf is going to pass for female. I think the shorter an ftm is the less plausible passing will seem to be - vice versa for mtf folks.

    4. What are the unique pressures that FTMs face in terms of body image in a misogynistic, heterosexist and transphobic culture? MTFs?
    FTM folks - I think the penis-pressure bears down pretty hard on ftm folks. There's all this emphasis in bio-male culture on penis-size, muscular vitality, etc. that it carries over 10 folk in the ftm community. If one is going to be safe in patriarchy, one must learn to be patriarchal - and I've seen this play out in the ftm community.
    MTF folks - Here in again we've got the patriarchy calling and the appropriate response for female-identified people is to be petite. I think the pressure here is more so than for bio-girls (like ftm folks) because you've got to make up for or fix what your body started out with.

    5. Do you experience the trans community as affirming of size diversity or as fat-positive?
    No. In fact I've experienced some of the most vicious anti-fat sentiment in the mtf community. Being trans/gender-variant and fat do not make for very safe days, I'm afraid.

    6. Do you experience the size acceptance community as trans-positive and affirming?
    I don't know that fat people are very trans/gender-variant acceptive, perhaps just that gender seems to blend more in the fat community. Like I said above - the fatter you get as a bio-girl the easier it is to buy "boy" clothing and appear more butch. So I think that ftm folks may not be accepted as much so as not considered as "freakish" if they don't come out. Mtf folks - eh. I don't know, but I think that fat-people clothing stores like Lane Bryant tend to be a bit nicer to mtf folks than anti-fat stores.

    7. Describe a particular conversation or life incident where issues of size and gender diversity intersected in some way.
    I was in a mediocre-trying-to-be-upscale buffet with my father and sister a few years ago. I had a shaved head, a few facial piercings, and a big bulky black sweater on. Sitting at the table waiting for the check, our server asks "so it's 1 adult, 1 adolescent boy, and 1 child?" and my father says "no..." and looks puzzled. The server points to me and says 'isn't he over twelve years old?" and we all crack up. Apparently I passed as a little kid, all 5'6 of me. Because I'm fat, was wearing bulky clothing, and had a shaved head - not only did I seem to be male, I seemed to be a young male.
    Later on I had to explain to my younger sister that just because I was assumed a boy doesn't mean I'm offended - nor does it mean I'm going to slather on some make-up and glitter. It simply means the way our culture defines "female" and "male"-ness is ridiculous and obviously doesn't work!
    Sunday, February 26th, 2006
    1:52 pm
    [transamazon]
    1. How does your identity as a trans or gender-variant person converge with your weight, height or body shape?

    I think there is a lot of pressures for MTFs to be thin, petite, and conform to femininity. This emanates from outside the trans community and from within it. I go to a lot of trans conventions and conferences and I always notice that the thin, pretty, passable girls get a lot more attention and tend to have a small entourage at all times. It sucks because I see the marginalization of the non-passable, the fat girls and those who do not/ can not conform to standards of traditional attractiveness. I always get questions about my height and asked where I buy my clothes/shoes.


    2. What are the unique pressures put on trans/gender-variant people in regards to their weight?
    Well, I think for MTFs there is a pressure to conform to hegemonic standards of femininity at all times. This includes being pretty, passable, thin, submissive, docile, and all that other shit. Sadly, a lot of MTFs buy into this bullshit, and thus we will never be taken seriously as a group. I also think capitalism and the marketplace of consumerism has a lot to do with this. pick up a trans magazine and you will find many examples of plastic surgeons selling their wares. we need facial feminization, breast augmentations, hair extensions, electrolysis, tummy tuck, face lift, liposuction etc. At the conventions, these surgeons are always there to present their surgeries. If one wants these, and is able to afford them, then go right ahead. But the notion of equal and fair "choice" is false. Many of the girls I talk to cannot afford SRS, much less these other proceudres. While there is finally more of an emphasis on socio-cultural issues SOMEtimes, there is still this medicalization stuff. Some trans women call themselves "biber girls" and place the surgeons on a pedestal. Sorry But I don't. They are getting VERY well compensated, they don't need gthe adulation.

    3. What is the intersection between trans passability/plausibility and height and weight?

    historically, the gender clinic system was really fucked up. there was a master narrative that transsexuals were supposed to conform to. For MTFs this meant being hyper-feminine, hating the penis, being attracted to men, wanting a feminine career (housewife or waitress or secretary) and being able to pass, blend in and cater to hegemonic notions of femininity. This is where we are coming from. Uggh!

    Some transsexuals were rejected for surgery for being "somatically inappropriate" the gatekeepers decided who was worthy of womanhood and who was not. Stories abound of "helping professionals" who used looksist, sizeist and sexist criteria for determining who could be a woman; this is the classic patriarchal gatekeeper. I heard of a doctor who needed to get a hard-on from sexual excitement when viewing his client in order to consider an MTF a woman. Nice test.

    Now, large, tall and fat trans women are often regarded as unseemly, unfeminine, garish, campy, or just plain pathetic. I find us beautiful, and many others do too, but we are in the minority.

    4. What are the unique pressures that FTMs face in terms of body image in a misogynistic, heterosexist and transphobic culture? MTFs?

    I am not an FTM so I can't speak to their experience. I think there are pressures there as well. As the body image for men have become more rigid, some FTMs probably internalize these standards. Plus there is the masculinity thing about being strong, muscular, cut, etc. that is so damaging and oppressive. Some FTMs come from the lesbian/feminist community where historically there were segments that were size friendly and fat positive. Younger generations of dykes seem to be replicating sizeism more than in the past. The L Word is a great example of a show that reporduces hegemonic standards of beauty, size and attractiveness.

    5. Do you experience the trans community as affirming of size diversity or as fat-positive?
    Not really. Again,I think the subculture often reproduces the standards of the dominant culture. I do not see people of sixe or fat-positive workshops at trans convnetions. I see mostly skinny people in trans publications and books. Loren Cameron's work does not feature much size diversity, and he emphasizes men with muscles, including his own bodybuilding. I think there needs to be a lot more education in the community and in the society as a whole.


    6. Do you experience the size acceptance community as trans-positive and affirming?

    I don't know. I have never been to a conference like NAAFA and have no idea how there are in terms of gender identity issues. I do know that in media reports they frequently feature women of size and their male admirers (mostly skinny). I hope this heterosexist strain is not too dominant and there are room for trans and queer people of size communities.

    7. Describe a particular conversation or life incident where issues of size and gender diversity intersected in some way.

    I was walking out of Jaques, a trans/drag bar in Boston. A truck about 20 feet off the ground went by with two white men. They screamed "feaks" at me and my friends. I gave them the finger and told them to fuck off, whereupon the guy yelled "you're too big for me to fuck." There it was: I was dually marked as a fat-ass and and a freak. This straight, white, red-neck male decided to label me as an unfuckable, fat, transvestite freak. More stories to come....
    Sunday, February 19th, 2006
    4:37 am
    [joe_aufenthie]
    weight...it's all like 10 pounds of make up I swear.
    For me, being gender deviant, I would think that weight plays a big part in everyone's lives whether you're male, female, trans, or non-trans.

    I know that for me, being a draq queen (and I would like to think a pretty one :-D) that the younger and thinner girls get tipped first. The sexier the outfit the more money they make. I know one friend who wears little on stage and gets twice as much money as my drag mother does. Not that performing is all about money, but my drag mother isn't really skinny, and I don't think she would look good in pasties and a thong.

    For me, I know I wouldn't wear skimpy things either, but it makes me self concious of what people think is worth money and what isn't. It sometimes feels like they tip the sexual skinny friend because she's sexual and skinny, whereas my drag mother tries to make the show more entertaining, more theatre, and people don't really like that it seems (though I do)

    weight, really plays an issue in the drag community.

    J.
    Thursday, February 16th, 2006
    9:12 am
    [andipandi]
    i just think its interesting that a bio girl can't be fat or largr becuase people will stare or make fun.. but if this same person starts looking like a male, and people see her as a male then all of the sudden its okay for a male to be fat or large or whatever.

    also, the smae applies for mtf's. many are larger with larger sholders and people in the world can't deal with a female with larger features. right? why? cus we're stupid.

    men can be fat and large.
    women have to be small and pettit.

    thats all.
    12:20 am
    [transamazon]
    Hello Folks. I am writing to ask your help on a project I am working on. I have created this new community and called it Transgender People of Size (TGPOS). I am asking folks to write posts here that consider the intersections of trans identity and size.

    1. How does your identity as a trans or gender-variant person converge with your weight, height or body shape?
    2. What are the unique pressures put on trans/gender-variant people in regards to their weight?
    3. What is the intersection between trans passability/plausibility and height and weight?
    4. What are the unique pressures that FTMs face in terms of body image in a misogynistic, heterosexist and transphobic culture? MTFs?
    5. Do you experience the trans community as affirming of size diversity or as fat-positive?
    6. Do you experience the size acceptance community as trans-positive and affirming?
    7. Describe a particular conversation or life incident where issues of size and gender diversity intersected in some way.

    These are just a few questions to get you started. The goal is to elicit experiences, feelings and personal theories and to foster a supportive environment that is explicitly pro-trans and pro-people of size/ fat-positive. Please feel free to tell folks about the community and encourage them to post. I also certainly do not wish to step on anybody's toes with this community. if there are already existing communities I should know about, please let me know! I thank you for your help and consideration!!!
About LiveJournal.com